Learning to play guitar is loads of fun, though playing chords may seem a little intimidating at first. Fear not, it is not much different than playing single notes: you're just playing them all at once! This article will walk you through the process of working out the fingering, and show you how to play some common chords. Pull out your axe, and rock on!

One of our goals at CCM is to instill in students a great appreciation for guitar and music that will last them a lifetime. Students at CCM have won numerous international guitar competitions, performed outreach concerts all over the world, and have gotten into the best colleges in the United States. Recent CCM graduates have gone on to Harvard, Stanford, Brown, and USC. Visit our Yelp pages to see what families have to say about our program.
First, you need to determine what type of guitar you have - acoustic nylon, acoustic steel string, or electric. You want to be sure to use the correct strings for your particular guitar. Acoustic guitars that require nylon strings, such as classical, flamenco and some folk guitars, generally have lighter tops, or soundboards, with less internal bracing than those found on steel-string acoustics, and stand the risk of serious damage if fitted with steel strings. Steel-string acoustics are designed to withstand the added stress that steel strings exert on the top, bridge, nut and neck, and won't sound very good with nylon strings, if they even fit. Electric guitar strings must be made of ferromagnetic metals like steel and nickel, so they can interact with the magnetic pickups, while acoustic-electric guitars typically use a different type of pickup which senses vibrations from the bridge, so acoustic strings may just have a steel core wound with a phosphor bronze alloy wrap for bright tone. Guitars with whammy bars might require a few extra steps to keep everything stable, so check your manufacturer's instructions or look for online videos.
If you're a fan of the Grateful Dead, check out the D'Angelico Premier Series DC Grateful Dead Semi-Hollow Electric Guitar. In the acoustic department, the Alvarez Artist Series AD60 dreadnought acoustic guitar comes highly rated, thanks to its hand-selected spruce top, mahogany back and sides, and powerful tone. Singer-songwriters and fans of acoustic-driven music must check out the latest Ed Sheeran Martin guitar, the comfortable, easy-to-play Divide Signature Edition Little Martin acoustic-electric.

School of Rock's highly-trained guitar instructors are experts when it comes to inspiring teens to learn to play the guitar like a pro. Our proven formula for learning to play the guitar effectively and quickly starts with private guitar lessons plus group rehearsals in a safe and friendly environment. All teens are enrolled in or audition for one of the following programs: Rock 101, Performance, House Band, and AllStars.


Left-handed players sometimes choose an opposite-handed (mirror) instrument, although some play in a standard-handed manner, others play a standard-handed guitar reversed, and still others (for example Jimi Hendrix) played a standard-handed guitar strung in reverse. This last configuration differs from a true opposite handed guitar in that the saddle is normally angled in such a way that the bass strings are slightly longer than the treble strings to improve intonation. Reversing the strings, therefore, reverses the relative orientation of the saddle, adversely affecting intonation, although in Hendrix's case, this is believed to have been an important element in his unique sound.
Dots are usually inlaid into the upper edge of the fretboard in the same positions, small enough to be visible only to the player. These usually appear on the odd numbered frets, but also on the 12th fret (the one octave mark) instead of the 11th and 13th frets. Some older or high-end instruments have inlays made of mother of pearl, abalone, ivory, colored wood or other exotic materials and designs. Simpler inlays are often made of plastic or painted. High-end classical guitars seldom have fretboard inlays as a well-trained player is expected to know his or her way around the instrument. In addition to fretboard inlay, the headstock and soundhole surround are also frequently inlaid. The manufacturer's logo or a small design is often inlaid into the headstock. Rosette designs vary from simple concentric circles to delicate fretwork mimicking the historic rosette of lutes. Bindings that edge the finger and sound boards are sometimes inlaid. Some instruments have a filler strip running down the length and behind the neck, used for strength or to fill the cavity through which the truss rod was installed in the neck.

The three notes of a major triad have been introduced as an ordered triplet, namely (root, third, fifth), where the major third is four semitones above the root and where the perfect fifth is seven semitones above the root. This type of triad is in closed position. Triads are quite commonly played in open position: For example, the C-major triad is often played with the third (E) and fifth (G) an octave higher, respectively sixteen and nineteen semitones above the root. Another variation of the major triad changes the order of the notes: For example, the C-major triad is often played as (C,G,E), where (C,G) is a perfect fifth and E is raised an octave above the perfect third (C,E). Alternative orderings of the notes in a triad are discussed below (in the discussions of chord inversions and drop-2 chords).


Play the A Major. This is another "big chord," sonically. There are several ways to play this. You can use one finger across the 2nd fret of the B, G, and D strings (playing C#, A, and E, respectively), or any other combination of fingers. For this example, we'll use the 4th finger on the B string, 3rd finger on the G string, and 2nd finger on the D string.
Our highly-trained professional instructors teach guitar lessons to beginners starting with the fundamentals, including scales, chords, tuning, arpeggios and rhythm. They then use famous rock songs to help guide guitar students through the early stages of musical development. Our beginner guitar lessons inspire creativity and help develop new students into world-class players with weekly private guitar lessons and group rehearsals. School of Rock's core philosophy is that the best way for students to gain musical proficiency is through performance-based music education. All of our lessons for guitar students include a performance aspect.
We believe that Guitar practice as an adult is more productive than it seems because it clears your head, it builds patience, discipline and concentration skills which you can transfer over to other parts of life, and it keeps your hand-eye coordination sharp. It also keeps you committed to learning and improvement, which again, are transferable traits to professional life. As role models, parents taking active classes shows kids the importance of pursuing personal interests for life.

The two most common types of acoustic guitar are the steel-string guitar and the classical guitar. The classical guitar, also known as the Spanish guitar, usually uses nylon strings. Steel-string guitars originated in the United States and are also referred to as western guitar and folk guitar. Steel-string guitars sound louder and brighter than classical guitars, which have a warmer, mellower sound. Steel-string models usually have larger bodies and narrower necks, and they often have a pickguard to protect the body against scratches by picks and fingernails. Most acoustic guitars have six strings, but there are also 12-string versions. When an acoustic guitar is hooked up to an amplifier, it is referred to as acoustic/electric. Some acoustic/electric guitars incorporate a cutaway design, which makes it easier for electric guitar players to cross over to acoustic.
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