Learning to play guitar is loads of fun, though playing chords may seem a little intimidating at first. Fear not, it is not much different than playing single notes: you're just playing them all at once! This article will walk you through the process of working out the fingering, and show you how to play some common chords. Pull out your axe, and rock on!
Picks come in many shapes and sizes. Picks vary from the small jazz pick to the large bass pick. The thickness of the pick often determines its use. A thinner pick (between 0.2 and 0.5 mm) is usually used for strumming or rhythm playing, whereas thicker picks (between 0.7 and 1.5+ mm) are usually used for single-note lines or lead playing. The distinctive guitar sound of Billy Gibbons is attributed to using a quarter or peso as a pick. Similarly, Brian May is known to use a sixpence coin as a pick, while noted 1970s and early 1980s session musician David Persons is known for using old credit cards, cut to the correct size, as plectrums.
Our highly-trained professional instructors teach guitar lessons to beginners starting with the fundamentals, including scales, chords, tuning, arpeggios and rhythm. They then use famous rock songs to help guide guitar students through the early stages of musical development. Our beginner guitar lessons inspire creativity and help develop new students into world-class players with weekly private guitar lessons and group rehearsals. School of Rock's core philosophy is that the best way for students to gain musical proficiency is through performance-based music education. All of our lessons for guitar students include a performance aspect.
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Most electric guitar bodies are made of wood and include a plastic pick guard. Boards wide enough to use as a solid body are very expensive due to the worldwide depletion of hardwood stock since the 1970s, so the wood is rarely one solid piece. Most bodies are made from two pieces of wood with some of them including a seam running down the center line of the body. The most common woods used for electric guitar body construction include maple, basswood, ash, poplar, alder, and mahogany. Many bodies consist of good-sounding, but inexpensive woods, like ash, with a "top", or thin layer of another, more attractive wood (such as maple with a natural "flame" pattern) glued to the top of the basic wood. Guitars constructed like this are often called "flame tops". The body is usually carved or routed to accept the other elements, such as the bridge, pickup, neck, and other electronic components. Most electrics have a polyurethane or nitrocellulose lacquer finish. Other alternative materials to wood are used in guitar body construction. Some of these include carbon composites, plastic material, such as polycarbonate, and aluminum alloys.


Through School of Rock's private guitar lessons and group rehearsals, children learn to play the guitar and eventually perform the songs they love in a fun, supportive and comfortable atmosphere. Based on the student's age and skill level, guitar lessons for kids are part of every School of Rock music program including Rookies, Rock 101, Performance, House Band, and AllStars.


Phosphor bronze strings have a warmer sound with a smooth (if somewhat understated) high end response. This makes them a great fit for genres that benefit from a mellower tone, like a lot of folk or finger-style work. These strings pair well with smaller bodied guitars, though many musicians who play more relaxed genres prefer these strings on larger bodied instruments as well.
Play the A Major. This is another "big chord," sonically. There are several ways to play this. You can use one finger across the 2nd fret of the B, G, and D strings (playing C#, A, and E, respectively), or any other combination of fingers. For this example, we'll use the 4th finger on the B string, 3rd finger on the G string, and 2nd finger on the D string.
Adjusting the truss rod affects the intonation of a guitar as well as the height of the strings from the fingerboard, called the action. Some truss rod systems, called double action truss systems, tighten both ways, pushing the neck both forward and backward (standard truss rods can only release to a point beyond which the neck is no longer compressed and pulled backward). The artist and luthier Irving Sloane pointed out, in his book Steel-String Guitar Construction, that truss rods are intended primarily to remedy concave bowing of the neck, but cannot correct a neck with "back bow" or one that has become twisted.[page needed] Classical guitars do not require truss rods, as their nylon strings exert a lower tensile force with lesser potential to cause structural problems. However, their necks are often reinforced with a strip of harder wood, such as an ebony strip that runs down the back of a cedar neck. There is no tension adjustment on this form of reinforcement.
I was lucky enough to meet Justin at the Guitar Institute during a summer school in 2004, and to have some private lessons with him afterwards.  He was the teacher who kickstarted my guitar career and persuaded me that I was ready to join a band.  That was 14 years ago and many dozens of gigs later.  I’m now just finishing a degree in Popular Music Performance.  Justin's online lessons are easy to follow and he has a manner about him which makes you believe that you can achieve.  Where he demonstrates songs, I have found his versions to be consistently more accurate and easy to follow than those of any other online teacher.  On this website you really will find all the skills and information you need to become an excellent musician.  Many thanks. Ian.
The three notes of a major triad have been introduced as an ordered triplet, namely (root, third, fifth), where the major third is four semitones above the root and where the perfect fifth is seven semitones above the root. This type of triad is in closed position. Triads are quite commonly played in open position: For example, the C-major triad is often played with the third (E) and fifth (G) an octave higher, respectively sixteen and nineteen semitones above the root. Another variation of the major triad changes the order of the notes: For example, the C-major triad is often played as (C,G,E), where (C,G) is a perfect fifth and E is raised an octave above the perfect third (C,E). Alternative orderings of the notes in a triad are discussed below (in the discussions of chord inversions and drop-2 chords).
Welcome to video eight in the Beginner Guitar Quick-Start Series. In this lesson, we’re going to go through your first two chords. You’ll learn A minor 7 and C major. These two guitar chords will be useful for you because you’ll be using them often through your guitar career. A minor 7 is good to start with because it is fairly easy, and C major is great chord to learn how to play clean sounding chords.
I tried several times over the course of 20 years to learn guitar. I purchased guitars, amps, books, private lessons. Nothing ever stuck, until I found justinguitar.com. The only reason I can play guitar today is because of Justin. His courses are well thought out, easy to understand, easy to follow, and easy to make progress on. I can't think of a single product or service that I've ever used in my life that I could recommend more highly than justinguitar.com.
For the second note of the A minor 7 chord, place your second finger on the second fret of the D string. This is the second of the two notes you need to fret to play this chord. Make sure you’re on the tip of your finger and right behind the fret. Now that you have both notes in place, strum the top five strings, remembering to leave the low E string out.
"With a note of music, one strikes the fundamental, and, in addition to the root note, other notes are generated: these are the harmonic series.... As one fundamental note contains within it other notes in the octave, two fundamentals produce a remarkable array of harmonics, and the number of possible combinations between all the notes increases phenomenally. With a triad, affairs stand a good chance of getting severely out of hand."
Phosphor bronze strings have a warmer sound with a smooth (if somewhat understated) high end response. This makes them a great fit for genres that benefit from a mellower tone, like a lot of folk or finger-style work. These strings pair well with smaller bodied guitars, though many musicians who play more relaxed genres prefer these strings on larger bodied instruments as well.
Most electric guitar bodies are made of wood and include a plastic pick guard. Boards wide enough to use as a solid body are very expensive due to the worldwide depletion of hardwood stock since the 1970s, so the wood is rarely one solid piece. Most bodies are made from two pieces of wood with some of them including a seam running down the center line of the body. The most common woods used for electric guitar body construction include maple, basswood, ash, poplar, alder, and mahogany. Many bodies consist of good-sounding, but inexpensive woods, like ash, with a "top", or thin layer of another, more attractive wood (such as maple with a natural "flame" pattern) glued to the top of the basic wood. Guitars constructed like this are often called "flame tops". The body is usually carved or routed to accept the other elements, such as the bridge, pickup, neck, and other electronic components. Most electrics have a polyurethane or nitrocellulose lacquer finish. Other alternative materials to wood are used in guitar body construction. Some of these include carbon composites, plastic material, such as polycarbonate, and aluminum alloys.
First off, there are two more techniques I want to talk about. These are fret placement and finger posture. Place your first finger on the first fret of the B string. For fret placement, you’ll want to have your finger right behind the fret. In the video, you can see that the further away from the fret I place my finger, the more buzz the note has.
I absolutely love my program. Leading edge technology, phenomenal instruction and course delivery. Interactive learning interface is top drawer. Paul Gilbert is an amazing amazing online teacher. I have seen more results with his program versus years of face to face lessons - I never thought this was possible via online means but you utterly pulled it off. I could not be more pleased.

Guitarists don’t have to just look on in envy as pianists lead the holiday sing-a-longs this Christmas. Our selection of holiday Guitar Tabs include traditional classics we all love like “O Holy Night” and “Carol of the Bells” and the pop favorites that just wouldn’t be the same without a guitar, like “Jingle Bell Rock” and “Happy Xmas (War is Over)” by John Lennon. But if you just can’t get enough of those traditional Christmas classics, you can pick up our collection of ’Christmas Favorites for Guitar.’

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