A guitar strap is a strip of material with an attachment mechanism on each end, made to hold a guitar via the shoulders at an adjustable length. Guitars have varying accommodations for attaching a strap. The most common are strap buttons, also called strap pins, which are flanged steel posts anchored to the guitar with screws. Two strap buttons come pre-attached to virtually all electric guitars, and many steel-string acoustic guitars. Strap buttons are sometimes replaced with "strap locks", which connect the guitar to the strap more securely.
Most electric guitar bodies are made of wood and include a plastic pick guard. Boards wide enough to use as a solid body are very expensive due to the worldwide depletion of hardwood stock since the 1970s, so the wood is rarely one solid piece. Most bodies are made from two pieces of wood with some of them including a seam running down the center line of the body. The most common woods used for electric guitar body construction include maple, basswood, ash, poplar, alder, and mahogany. Many bodies consist of good-sounding, but inexpensive woods, like ash, with a "top", or thin layer of another, more attractive wood (such as maple with a natural "flame" pattern) glued to the top of the basic wood. Guitars constructed like this are often called "flame tops". The body is usually carved or routed to accept the other elements, such as the bridge, pickup, neck, and other electronic components. Most electrics have a polyurethane or nitrocellulose lacquer finish. Other alternative materials to wood are used in guitar body construction. Some of these include carbon composites, plastic material, such as polycarbonate, and aluminum alloys.
The electric guitar, developed for popular music in the United States in the 1930s, usually has a solid, nonresonant body. The sound of its strings is both amplified and manipulated electronically by the performer. American musician and inventor Les Paul developed prototypes for the solidbody electric guitar and popularized the instrument beginning in the 1940s.
One of our goals at CCM is to instill in students a great appreciation for guitar and music that will last them a lifetime. Students at CCM have won numerous international guitar competitions, performed outreach concerts all over the world, and have gotten into the best colleges in the United States. Recent CCM graduates have gone on to Harvard, Stanford, Brown, and USC. Visit our Yelp pages to see what families have to say about our program.
With so many options available in the world today, buying a guitar that perfectly represents your own style, tastes, and attitude has never been easier. Whether you're a classical guitarist looking for that perfectly balanced nylon flamenco, or a hard rock enthusiast who needs Pete Townshend crunch combined with Jack White power, there is simply no shortage of axes to choose from.
YellowBrickCinema’s Sleep Music is the perfect relaxing music to help you go to sleep, and enjoy deep sleep. Our music for sleeping is the best music for stress relief, to reduce insomnia, and encourage dreaming. Our calm music for sleeping uses Delta Waves and soft instrumental music to help you achieve deep relaxation, and fall asleep. Our relaxing sleep music can be used as background music, meditation music, relaxation music, peaceful music and sleep music. Let our soothing music and calming music help you enjoy relaxing deep sleep.
So with that in mind, would you like to learn the guitar on your own or with others? The choice is yours at Guitar Center. If you prefer one-on-one instruction, that's absolutely doable - in fact, you'll find our schedule to be very flexible. Of course, learning in a group is an excellent way to meet like-minded musicians with similar tastes and share ideas on how to improve one another's craft. Who knows, you might even leave a group guitar lesson with plans to start a band with your newfound musical companions. Either way, our group and private guitar lessons are very entertaining and informative.
Musicians Institute programs are fast paced and certain fundamental musical skills are required before you can begin your program. If you meet entry requirements and are accepted, a one-on-one performance evaluation and placement testing will be held during registration to determine whether you qualify for advanced placement in any area of course work. You are evaluated based on the content of your submission. For more info, please see the MI Course Catalog.
Established in 1994, Saratoga Guitar has been a main stay in the Capital Region Music community for over 20 years! As the founder of the Capital Region Guitar Show (The 2019 Capital Region Guitar Show will be held April 12th & 13th 2019) and promoter of many live music events in the area, Saratoga Guitar has become home to professionals, collectors, families, and students alike. Offering new, used, and vintage instruments from all major manufacturers, at Saratoga Guitar you will always find something different than what you would find at a big box music store. Saratoga Guitar also provides full rentals, sales & services for all school related music programs.

All three principal types of resonator guitars were invented by the Slovak-American John Dopyera (1893–1988) for the National and Dobro (Dopyera Brothers) companies. Similar to the flat top guitar in appearance, but with a body that may be made of brass, nickel-silver, or steel as well as wood, the sound of the resonator guitar is produced by one or more aluminum resonator cones mounted in the middle of the top. The physical principle of the guitar is therefore similar to the loudspeaker.

As their categorical name suggests, extended chords indeed extend seventh chords by stacking one or more additional third-intervals, successively constructing ninth, eleventh, and finally thirteenth chords; thirteenth chords contain all seven notes of the diatonic scale. In closed position, extended chords contain dissonant intervals or may sound supersaturated, particularly thirteenth chords with their seven notes. Consequently, extended chords are often played with the omission of one or more tones, especially the fifth and often the third,[92][93] as already noted for seventh chords; similarly, eleventh chords often omit the ninth, and thirteenth chords the ninth or eleventh. Often, the third is raised an octave, mimicking its position in the root's sequence of harmonics.[92]


A guitar's frets, fretboard, tuners, headstock, and truss rod, all attached to a long wooden extension, collectively constitute its neck. The wood used to make the fretboard usually differs from the wood in the rest of the neck. The bending stress on the neck is considerable, particularly when heavier gauge strings are used (see Tuning), and the ability of the neck to resist bending (see Truss rod) is important to the guitar's ability to hold a constant pitch during tuning or when strings are fretted. The rigidity of the neck with respect to the body of the guitar is one determinant of a good instrument versus a poor-quality one.
{"eVar4":"shop: accessories","eVar5":"shop: accessories: strings","pageName":"[gc] shop: accessories: strings","reportSuiteIds":"guitarcenterprod","eVar3":"shop","prop2":"[gc] shop: accessories: strings","prop1":"[gc] shop: accessories","evar51":"default: united states","prop10":"category","prop11":"strings","prop5":"[gc] shop: accessories: strings","prop6":"[gc] shop: accessories: strings","prop3":"[gc] shop: accessories: strings","prop4":"[gc] shop: accessories: strings","channel":"[gc] shop","linkInternalFilters":"javascript:,guitarcenter.com","prop7":"[gc] sub category"}
The ratio of the spacing of two consecutive frets is {\displaystyle {\sqrt[{12}]{2}}} (twelfth root of two). In practice, luthiers determine fret positions using the constant 17.817—an approximation to 1/(1-1/ {\displaystyle {\sqrt[{12}]{2}}} ). If the nth fret is a distance x from the bridge, then the distance from the (n+1)th fret to the bridge is x-(x/17.817).[15] Frets are available in several different gauges and can be fitted according to player preference. Among these are "jumbo" frets, which have much thicker gauge, allowing for use of a slight vibrato technique from pushing the string down harder and softer. "Scalloped" fretboards, where the wood of the fretboard itself is "scooped out" between the frets, allow a dramatic vibrato effect. Fine frets, much flatter, allow a very low string-action, but require that other conditions, such as curvature of the neck, be well-maintained to prevent buzz.
Some piezo-equipped guitars use a hexaphonic pickup. "Hex" is a prefix meaning six. A hexaphonic pickup produces a separate output for each string, usually from a discrete piezoelectric or magnetic pickup for each string. This arrangement lets on-board or external electronics process the strings individually for modeling or Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) conversion. Roland makes hexaphonic pickups for guitar and bass, and a line of guitar modeling and synthesis products. Line 6's hexaphonic-equipped Variax guitars use on-board electronics to model the sound after various vintage instruments, and vary pitch on individual strings.
Lucky you, guitar players from all over the world, to take advantage of the tutorials presented in Justin's comprehensive website! Whatever the style you fancy, Justin is there for you with generous and precise guidance to help you enhance your playing and by doing so, introduce you to so many ways of approaching the guitar and discover new artists along the way. I wish there would have been such a medium and dedicated host around when I started to learn how to play. Bravo Justin, and my gratitude for bringing music to the heart and ears of many!

Every songwriter runs into writers' block at some point in their career. To help you dig your way out of the dreaded doldrums of songwriters' block, we put together 25 songwriting tips and prompts plus great songs to inspire you. Check out these songwriting tips and find your muse today!   Bonus: Take the quiz to find out what you should write your next song about! Write about your day. Think your life is boring and you have nothing to say? Check out the lyrics to thi
Bolt-on necks, though they are historically associated with cheaper instruments, do offer greater flexibility in the guitar's set-up, and allow easier access for neck joint maintenance and repairs. Another type of neck, only available for solid body electric guitars, is the neck-through-body construction. These are designed so that everything from the machine heads down to the bridge are located on the same piece of wood. The sides (also known as wings) of the guitar are then glued to this central piece. Some luthiers prefer this method of construction as they claim it allows better sustain of each note. Some instruments may not have a neck joint at all, having the neck and sides built as one piece and the body built around it.
In 1977, the Guitar Institute of Technology (GIT) revolutionized contemporary music education with the first full-time program to offer hands-on professional training for the electric guitarist. Over three decades later, MI remains the leader in guitar education, besting other colleges for guitar players, with a unique system that combines technical, creative and professional development in a performance-based program.
×