Justin Sandercoe has thought long and hard about how to teach people to play the guitar, and how to do this over the internet. He has come up with a well-designed series of courses that will take you from nowhere to proficiency. I tried to learn how to play years ago, using books, and got nowhere. I've been using Justin's site for just over a year and I feel I've made real progress. What's more, Justin offers his lessons for free - a boon for any young player who has the urge to play, but whose pockets are empty. I've seen and used other sites for learners: none of them offer as clearly marked a road as Justin does.
Russell, George (2001) [1953]. "Chapter 1 The Lydian scale: The seminal source of the principal of tonal gravity". George Russell's Lydian chromatic concept of tonal organization. Volume One: The art and science of tonal gravity (Fourth (Second printing, corrected, 2008) ed.). Brookline, Massachusetts: Concept Publishing Company. pp. 1–9. ISBN 0-9703739-0-2.

There really isn't a best age for kids to start guitar lessons, but most children under the age of 7 generally don't have the dexterity or patience needed to learn to play the guitar. With persistence and motivation some kids have learned to play guitar at some impressively young ages, but it really comes down to is the individual attitude and maturity level of the student. 
Learning to play guitar is loads of fun, though playing chords may seem a little intimidating at first. Fear not, it is not much different than playing single notes: you're just playing them all at once! This article will walk you through the process of working out the fingering, and show you how to play some common chords. Pull out your axe, and rock on!
This book is smaller than I thought it would be, but it's fairly thick. The book is 6.5 inches wide, 9.5 inches 'tall', and slightly more than 1 inch thick. It is not spiral bound and so it does not lay flat very well at all. After I located a song that I wanted to play, I tried to force the book to lay flat by pushing down on the spine. It didn't help much and it is frustrating when the book wants to close while you're reading it. I might have to take it somewhere to have it spiral bound. The songs are listed in alphabetical order which makes it easy to find the song you're looking for if you know the title. And here is the part that surprised me: The book contains lyrics, chord diagrams, and chord names "only". It ... full review
We believe that music is a social activity so we present students with numerous opportunities to interact with each other. Each year we hold multiple recitals which offer a low-pressure opportunity to perform in front of an audience with other like-minded music students.  In addition to recitals, students frequently go out into the community to perform outreach concerts at local hospitals, schools, and nursing homes. Students also have the option to join group classes at our Santa Clara location. This offers students a chance to perform for each other more frequently, as well as join on our many performance ensembles. 
Are you stuck in a musical rut? New tunings and tricks can help you keep learning guitar in fresh, fun ways. Try one of these great tips from guitar teacher Samuel B. to breathe new life into your guitar playing... One of the first things I tell any new student is that I don't specialize in a formal discipline. If jazz or classical training is your objective, then I'm not your guy. Instead, I specialize primarily in American roots music (that which we tend to casually lump together as "folk" … Read More

The teen and tween years are the make or break years for most people, in deciding whether they’re going to stick with a childhood hobby or interest, for life. As you go through puberty, and begin preparing for life as an adult, and responsibilities pile on your plate, the first things to go tend to be the personal interests you’re passionate about, because they don’t pay the bills. Also, because they’re not an official part of your school curriculum. In other words, what was once a must-have becomes a nice-to-have.
The two most common types of acoustic guitar are the steel-string guitar and the classical guitar. The classical guitar, also known as the Spanish guitar, usually uses nylon strings. Steel-string guitars originated in the United States and are also referred to as western guitar and folk guitar. Steel-string guitars sound louder and brighter than classical guitars, which have a warmer, mellower sound. Steel-string models usually have larger bodies and narrower necks, and they often have a pickguard to protect the body against scratches by picks and fingernails. Most acoustic guitars have six strings, but there are also 12-string versions. When an acoustic guitar is hooked up to an amplifier, it is referred to as acoustic/electric. Some acoustic/electric guitars incorporate a cutaway design, which makes it easier for electric guitar players to cross over to acoustic.

As previously stated, a dominant seventh is a four-note chord combining a major chord and a minor seventh. For example, the C7 dominant seventh chord adds B♭ to the C-major chord (C,E,G). The naive chord (C,E,G,B♭) spans six frets from fret 3 to fret 8;[49] such seventh chords "contain some pretty serious stretches in the left hand".[46] An illustration shows a naive C7 chord, which would be extremely difficult to play,[49] besides the open-position C7 chord that is conventional in standard tuning.[49][50] The standard-tuning implementation of a C7 chord is a second-inversion C7 drop 2 chord, in which the second-highest note in a second inversion of the C7 chord is lowered by an octave.[49][51][52] Drop-two chords are used for sevenths chords besides the major-minor seventh with dominant function,[53] which are discussed in the section on intermediate chords, below. Drop-two chords are used particularly in jazz guitar.[54] Drop-two second-inversions are examples of openly voiced chords, which are typical of standard tuning and other popular guitar-tunings.[55]
First, being able to learn directly from amazing artists like Paul Gilbert is incredible. He's a great teacher and has a way of explaining things that are easy to understand and replicate. The video format is also extraordinarily helpful; I've used other sites that use only written materials (usually .pdf format), and they are difficult to navigate. The feedback, though, is what really makes this website head and shoulders above the others (even the other video websites). When I record myself and send it in, I get a response from Paul that critiques in an incredibly constructive way as well as additional exercises to work at really honing that skill. In addition, getting to see what tips he gave to other users is awesome! If you want to learn an instrument, there's no better way.

This is by far the best online instruction. The fact you receive instruction from an established professional musician who wants to hear and see you play and has the enthusiasm to want you to become the best guitar player/musician you can be speaks volumes about the level and dedication he has towards his students. This is a great value and I recommend it to everyone I know who is learning guitar.
The Guitar Program at Musicians Institute is designed to develop professional level technique and musicianship through performance-intensive and immersive experiences. Guitar classes are taught by leading professionals and students will get trained in the basics of guitar playing, including performance, ear training, melodic soloing along a huge variety of contemporary styles.
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