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Though they may not be as exciting of a topic as instruments or amplifiers, choosing the right type of strings for your guitar is incredibly important. Guitar strings have different responses and different feels, and when the right type of string is used it’s a huge asset to your playing. Likewise, when the wrong type of string is used it can be incredibly detrimental.

For the longest time I have "messed around" with my guitar. I bought a book on Jazz guitar chords many years ago and found that those fingerings were way above my skill level. I decided to get a basic chord book to reinitiate myself. This is that book. Going through these pages has re-ignited my lust to learn more about playing my guitar. One chord at a time. Simple. Skip to another key just as simple. Actually, I haven't realized how many chords I really know how to play. I just need to learn the name of those chords. This book will help with that too. Give it a try.
As a beginner guitar player, one of the most difficult hurdles to overcome is that of transition between chords. We learn the chords to our favourite songs or a new complex chord shape, but when it comes to making music with them, our lack of muscle memory and dexterity inhibits us from stringing these chords together in a meaningful and comprehensive manner.

For the second note of the A minor 7 chord, place your second finger on the second fret of the D string. This is the second of the two notes you need to fret to play this chord. Make sure you’re on the tip of your finger and right behind the fret. Now that you have both notes in place, strum the top five strings, remembering to leave the low E string out.
Learning to play guitar is loads of fun, though playing chords may seem a little intimidating at first. Fear not, it is not much different than playing single notes: you're just playing them all at once! This article will walk you through the process of working out the fingering, and show you how to play some common chords. Pull out your axe, and rock on!
Kyser®'s 92/8 phosphor bronze acoustic strings quickly settle in to give your guitar a warm, bright, and well balanced tone. They are precision wound with a corrosion resistant blend of 92% copper and 8% tin phosphide onto a carefully drawn hex shaped high carbon steel core. The result is a long lasting, even tone, with excellent intonation. Click the individual string images to view more gauge information.
Only two or three frets are needed for the guitar chords—major, minor, and dominant sevenths—which are emphasized in introductions to guitar-playing and to the fundamentals of music.[87][88] Each major and minor chord can be played on exactly two successive frets on exactly three successive strings, and therefore each needs only two fingers. Other chords—seconds, fourths, sevenths, and ninths—are played on only three successive frets.[89]
At MI, you learn from a proven curriculum taught by the best guitar instructors in the world, augmented by visiting artists’ seminars, concerts, and lessons from some of the greatest players in contemporary music. At our guitar music college, you get to network with other players, find your creative voice, and get the training you need to become the player you have always dreamed of being.
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