While the free guitar lessons here will help you get started, we always recommend committed students to invest in their guitar skills by starting a Guitareo membership. That’s where you’ll get a more comprehensive library of step-by-step video lessons so you always know exactly what to learn next, play-along songs so you can apply your skills to real music, and community support so you’ll get all of your questions answered. Click here to learn more about Guitareo.
With the massive range of options available, you'd have to spend the whole day here to go through every one. There are six and twelve-strings, models specifically made for beginners, limited edition double necks; you name it, you'll find it! For a real classic, strap on a Rickenbacker 330 electric guitar. A staple in 60's mod culture, the unique hollowbody construction, slim neck and contoured body make the Rickenbacker 330 so easy to play that it has held the status as one of the all-time greatest guitars for decades.

In music, a guitar chord is a set of notes played on a guitar. A chord's notes are often played simultaneously, but they can be played sequentially in an arpeggio. The implementation of guitar chords depends on the guitar tuning. Most guitars used in popular music have six strings with the "standard" tuning of the Spanish classical-guitar, namely E-A-D-G-B-E' (from the lowest pitched string to the highest); in standard tuning, the intervals present among adjacent strings are perfect fourths except for the major third (G,B). Standard tuning requires four chord-shapes for the major triads.
A guitar's frets, fretboard, tuners, headstock, and truss rod, all attached to a long wooden extension, collectively constitute its neck. The wood used to make the fretboard usually differs from the wood in the rest of the neck. The bending stress on the neck is considerable, particularly when heavier gauge strings are used (see Tuning), and the ability of the neck to resist bending (see Truss rod) is important to the guitar's ability to hold a constant pitch during tuning or when strings are fretted. The rigidity of the neck with respect to the body of the guitar is one determinant of a good instrument versus a poor-quality one.
A string’s gauge is how thick it is. As a general rule, the thicker a string is the warmer its response will be and the more volume it will produce. However, thicker strings are also stiffer. This makes it harder to fret the string and makes it more difficult to execute heavy string bends. Thinner strings are generally brighter and easier to play, but on some instruments they can sound thin and tinny.
The lower strap button is usually located at the bottom (bridge end) of the body. The upper strap button is usually located near or at the top (neck end) of the body: on the upper body curve, at the tip of the upper "horn" (on a double cutaway), or at the neck joint (heel). Some electrics, especially those with odd-shaped bodies, have one or both strap buttons on the back of the body. Some Steinberger electric guitars, owing to their minimalist and lightweight design, have both strap buttons at the bottom of the body. Rarely, on some acoustics, the upper strap button is located on the headstock. Some acoustic and classical guitars only have a single strap button at the bottom of the body—the other end must be tied onto the headstock, above the nut and below the machine heads.
There really isn't a best age for kids to start guitar lessons, but most children under the age of 7 generally don't have the dexterity or patience needed to learn to play the guitar. With persistence and motivation some kids have learned to play guitar at some impressively young ages, but it really comes down to is the individual attitude and maturity level of the student. 

The pickguard, also known as the scratchplate, is usually a piece of laminated plastic or other material that protects the finish of the top of the guitar from damage due to the use of a plectrum ("pick") or fingernails. Electric guitars sometimes mount pickups and electronics on the pickguard. It is a common feature on steel-string acoustic guitars. Some performance styles that use the guitar as a percussion instrument (tapping the top or sides between notes, etc.), such as flamenco, require that a scratchplate or pickguard be fitted to nylon-string instruments.
All three principal types of resonator guitars were invented by the Slovak-American John Dopyera (1893–1988) for the National and Dobro (Dopyera Brothers) companies. Similar to the flat top guitar in appearance, but with a body that may be made of brass, nickel-silver, or steel as well as wood, the sound of the resonator guitar is produced by one or more aluminum resonator cones mounted in the middle of the top. The physical principle of the guitar is therefore similar to the loudspeaker.

The twelve-string guitar usually has steel strings, and it is widely used in folk music, blues, and rock and roll. Rather than having only six strings, the 12-string guitar has six courses made up of two strings each, like a mandolin or lute. The highest two courses are tuned in unison, while the others are tuned in octaves. The 12-string guitar is also made in electric forms. The chime-like sound of the 12-string electric guitar was the basis of jangle pop.
A six-string guitar has five musical-intervals between its consecutive strings. In standard tuning, the intervals are four perfect-fourths and one major-third, the comparatively irregular interval for the (G,B) pair. Consequently, standard tuning requires four chord-shapes for the major chords. There are separate chord-forms for chords having their root note on the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth strings.[41] Of course, a beginner learns guitar by learning notes and chords,[42] and irregularities make learning the guitar difficult[43]—even more difficult than learning the formation of plural nouns in German, according to Gary Marcus.[44] Nonetheless, most beginners use standard tuning.[45]
After you’re feeling more comfortable with the transitions, plug in this progression to your Uberchord. You should find that it’s much easier to play along with the progressions. Even with chords you aren’t yet comfortable with. The key to playing cleanly and precisely is training yourself to pay attention to the movement of your fingers. You’ll find that this heightened awareness translates into every new chord you learn.

Musicians Institute programs are fast paced and certain fundamental musical skills are required before you can begin your program. If you meet entry requirements and are accepted, a one-on-one performance evaluation and placement testing will be held during registration to determine whether you qualify for advanced placement in any area of course work. You are evaluated based on the content of your submission. For more info, please see the MI Course Catalog.
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