the fifth, which is a perfect fifth above the root; consequently, the fifth is a third above the third—either a minor third above a major third or a major third above a minor third.[13][14] The major triad has a root, a major third, and a fifth. (The major chord's major-third interval is replaced by a minor-third interval in the minor chord, which shall be discussed in the next subsection.)
The loud, amplified sound and sonic power of the electric guitar played through a guitar amp has played a key role in the development of blues and rock music, both as an accompaniment instrument (playing riffs and chords) and performing guitar solos, and in many rock subgenres, notably heavy metal music and punk rock. The electric guitar has had a major influence on popular culture. The guitar is used in a wide variety of musical genres worldwide. It is recognized as a primary instrument in genres such as blues, bluegrass, country, flamenco, folk, jazz, jota, mariachi, metal, punk, reggae, rock, soul, and many forms of pop.
Students can earn a Certificate in MI’s Performance Studies program for Guitar. With an innovative 360-degree approach to music education, MI Certificates are centered on Harmony, Theory and Ear Training, with core subjects in Reading, Technique and Performance. This Certificate program provides students with a broad foundation of knowledge and practical experience, encouraging the rapid development of skills in preparation for a range of professional music performance situations.
The California Conservatory of Music offers guitar lessons with the most qualified teachers in the Bay Area at both our Santa Clara and Redwood City schools. Whether you're looking to start your young child with Suzuki guitar lessons, preparing for a college audition, or getting reading for an upcoming concert, we can assist you. We offer the Bay Area’s most comprehensive guitar lessons which include technique, sight reading, music theory, and in addition to the private lessons, we offer ensemble, repertoire, and theory classes on the weekends. For students under the age of 8, we ask the parents to be involved in their guitar lessons and practice at home. To better help parents develop in to this role, the first three lessons are dedicated to the parent education class. The child can then begin their guitar lessons. This helps ensures the student’s success and motivation. 
On almost all modern electric guitars, the bridge has saddles that are adjustable for each string so that intonation stays correct up and down the neck. If the open string is in tune, but sharp or flat when frets are pressed, the bridge saddle position can be adjusted with a screwdriver or hex key to remedy the problem. In general, flat notes are corrected by moving the saddle forward and sharp notes by moving it backwards. On an instrument correctly adjusted for intonation, the actual length of each string from the nut to the bridge saddle is slightly, but measurably longer than the scale length of the instrument. This additional length is called compensation, which flattens all notes a bit to compensate for the sharping of all fretted notes caused by stretching the string during fretting.
Renaissance and Baroque guitars are the ancestors of the modern classical and flamenco guitar. They are substantially smaller, more delicate in construction, and generate less volume. The strings are paired in courses as in a modern 12-string guitar, but they only have four or five courses of strings rather than six single strings normally used now. They were more often used as rhythm instruments in ensembles than as solo instruments, and can often be seen in that role in early music performances. (Gaspar Sanz's Instrucción de Música sobre la Guitarra Española of 1674 contains his whole output for the solo guitar.)[10] Renaissance and Baroque guitars are easily distinguished, because the Renaissance guitar is very plain and the Baroque guitar is very ornate, with ivory or wood inlays all over the neck and body, and a paper-cutout inverted "wedding cake" inside the hole.
The top, back and ribs of an acoustic guitar body are very thin (1–2 mm), so a flexible piece of wood called lining is glued into the corners where the rib meets the top and back. This interior reinforcement provides 5 to 20 mm of solid gluing area for these corner joints. Solid linings are often used in classical guitars, while kerfed lining is most often found in steel string acoustics. Kerfed lining is also called kerfing because it is scored, or "kerfed"(incompletely sawn through), to allow it to bend with the shape of the rib). During final construction, a small section of the outside corners is carved or routed out and filled with binding material on the outside corners and decorative strips of material next to the binding, which are called purfling. This binding serves to seal off the end grain of the top and back. Purfling can also appear on the back of an acoustic guitar, marking the edge joints of the two or three sections of the back. Binding and purfling materials are generally made of either wood or plastic.
Solo, lead, and rhythm guitarists everywhere can now access the best selection of instantly downloadable digital sheet music and guitar tab on the internet. Put down the pick for just a moment and put your fingers to work browsing through Musicnotes.com's vast archives of guitar tabs ready to be enjoyed by musicians of all ages. Our collection features a weekly updated catalogue of some of guitars greatest compilations.
At MI, you learn from a proven curriculum taught by the best guitar instructors in the world, augmented by visiting artists’ seminars, concerts, and lessons from some of the greatest players in contemporary music. At our guitar music college, you get to network with other players, find your creative voice, and get the training you need to become the player you have always dreamed of being.
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