We believe that music is a social activity so we present students with numerous opportunities to interact with each other. Each year we hold multiple recitals which offer a low-pressure opportunity to perform in front of an audience with other like-minded music students.  In addition to recitals, students frequently go out into the community to perform outreach concerts at local hospitals, schools, and nursing homes. Students also have the option to join group classes at our Santa Clara location. This offers students a chance to perform for each other more frequently, as well as join on our many performance ensembles. 
I design my guitar lessons around each individual student and strive to keep the lesson light and enjoyable while also aiming for a high standard of education. Whether you are looking to play for pleasure at home,around the campfire,or want to learn practical music theory for composition and/or improvisation. I have instruction programs for all levels and styles from beginner to advanced and from ages 7 years on up.

With the advent of YouTube tutorials for just about everything, it's only fitting that there are a lot of videos out there claiming to be able to teach you how to play guitar. While you might think this is a quick and easy way to become a pro, you'll want to make sure you have all of the information before diving in headfirst. Online Tutorials When you're surfing the Internet, you'll come across many different websites with prerecorded tutorials to help you learn guitar online. But the keywo
MIDI converters use a hexaphonic guitar signal to determine pitch, duration, attack, and decay characteristics. The MIDI sends the note information to an internal or external sound bank device. The resulting sound closely mimics numerous instruments. The MIDI setup can also let the guitar be used as a game controller (i.e., Rock Band Squier) or as an instructional tool, as with the Fretlight Guitar.
With the C major chord, put that shape on the guitar for thirty seconds, take it off, shake it out, and repeat the process a few times. As you’re making the shape, remember to come right behind the frets on the tips of your fingers. When you’re starting out, you may have to place each finger down one at a time, but that’s natural. You’ll get better with time and eventually be able to go right to the chord.
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UPDATE: SEPTEMBER 3rd, 2010 -- Good evening, and hi everybody! I get requests to add tabs once in a while, and for years one of the most common requests has been 'Psychic Hearts', and more recently 'Trees Outside the Academy'. I resisted for years, but boredom and the need to please has a funny way of making things happen, so I'm proud to bring you tabs for the entirety of "Psychic Hearts" and its related tracks, as well as the majority of "Trees Outside the Academy". I was originally planning on providing bass tabs as well as the Mascis solos, but I decided I wasn't that desperate for accolade. With all this attention on Thurston, I felt bad for Lee, so I've updated my outdated tab for his excellent solo acoustic piece "Here" (located under "Other Tabs") with the proper tuning, which also happens to be the tuning for the equally excellent "Lee #2", so I've updated that one too!
Almost all guitars have frets, which are metal strips (usually nickel alloy or stainless steel) embedded along the fretboard and located at exact points that divide the scale length in accordance with a specific mathematical formula. The exceptions include fretless bass guitars and very rare fretless guitars. Pressing a string against a fret determines the strings' vibrating length and therefore its resultant pitch. The pitch of each consecutive fret is defined at a half-step interval on the chromatic scale. Standard classical guitars have 19 frets and electric guitars between 21 and 24 frets, although guitars have been made with as many as 27 frets. Frets are laid out to accomplish an equal tempered division of the octave. Each set of twelve frets represents an octave. The twelfth fret divides the scale length exactly into two halves, and the 24th fret position divides one of those halves in half again.
Some piezo-equipped guitars use a hexaphonic pickup. "Hex" is a prefix meaning six. A hexaphonic pickup produces a separate output for each string, usually from a discrete piezoelectric or magnetic pickup for each string. This arrangement lets on-board or external electronics process the strings individually for modeling or Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) conversion. Roland makes hexaphonic pickups for guitar and bass, and a line of guitar modeling and synthesis products. Line 6's hexaphonic-equipped Variax guitars use on-board electronics to model the sound after various vintage instruments, and vary pitch on individual strings.
Archtop guitars are steel-string instruments in which the top (and often the back) of the instrument are carved, from a solid billet, into a curved, rather than a flat, shape. This violin-like construction is usually credited to the American Orville Gibson. Lloyd Loar of the Gibson Mandolin-Guitar Mfg. Co introduced the violin-inspired "F"-shaped hole design now usually associated with archtop guitars, after designing a style of mandolin of the same type. The typical archtop guitar has a large, deep, hollow body whose form is much like that of a mandolin or a violin-family instrument. Nowadays, most archtops are equipped with magnetic pickups, and they are therefore both acoustic and electric. F-hole archtop guitars were immediately adopted, upon their release, by both jazz and country musicians, and have remained particularly popular in jazz music, usually with flatwound strings.
There are many different styles of play. Chords are played by strumming all of the strings. Classical guitarists pluck the strings with their fingers and always play sitting down. Slide guitarists slide along the strings with a slide made of metal or glass. Whether you're interested in classical, bluegrass, flamenco, folk or blues, the acoustic guitar is something you can enjoy playing alone or in a group.

Welcome to video eight in the Beginner Guitar Quick-Start Series. In this lesson, we’re going to go through your first two chords. You’ll learn A minor 7 and C major. These two guitar chords will be useful for you because you’ll be using them often through your guitar career. A minor 7 is good to start with because it is fairly easy, and C major is great chord to learn how to play clean sounding chords.

Electric guitars, introduced in the 1930s, use an amplifier and a loudspeaker that both makes the sound of the instrument loud enough for the performers and audience to hear, and, given that it produces an electric signal when played, that can electronically manipulate and shape the tone using an equalizer (e.g., bass and treble tone controls) and a huge variety of electronic effects units, the most commonly used ones being distortion (or "overdrive") and reverb. Early amplified guitars employed a hollow body, but a solid wood body was eventually found more suitable during the 1960s and 1970s, as it was less prone to unwanted acoustic feedback "howls". As with acoustic guitars, there are a number of types of electric guitars, including hollowbody guitars, archtop guitars (used in jazz guitar, blues and rockabilly) and solid-body guitars, which are widely used in rock music.


On guitars that have them, these components and the wires that connect them allow the player to control some aspects of the sound like volume or tone using knobs, switches, or buttons. The most basic electronic control is a volume knob. Some guitars also have a tone-control knob, and some guitars with multiple pickups have pickup selector switches or knobs to determine which pickup(s) are activated. At their simplest, these consist of passive components, such as potentiometers and capacitors, but may also include specialized integrated circuits or other active components requiring batteries for power, for preamplification and signal processing, or even for electronic tuning. In many cases, the electronics have some sort of shielding to prevent pickup of external interference and noise.
I have heard how giving you are in so many respects of music schooling and I must say that I am impressed. You remind me of the pure idealism that we had in starting Apple. If I were young, with time, I'd likely offer to join and help you in your endeavours. Keep making people happy, not just in their own learning, but in the example you set for them. 

So with that in mind, would you like to learn the guitar on your own or with others? The choice is yours at Guitar Center. If you prefer one-on-one instruction, that's absolutely doable - in fact, you'll find our schedule to be very flexible. Of course, learning in a group is an excellent way to meet like-minded musicians with similar tastes and share ideas on how to improve one another's craft. Who knows, you might even leave a group guitar lesson with plans to start a band with your newfound musical companions. Either way, our group and private guitar lessons are very entertaining and informative.


The two most common types of acoustic guitar are the steel-string guitar and the classical guitar. The classical guitar, also known as the Spanish guitar, usually uses nylon strings. Steel-string guitars originated in the United States and are also referred to as western guitar and folk guitar. Steel-string guitars sound louder and brighter than classical guitars, which have a warmer, mellower sound. Steel-string models usually have larger bodies and narrower necks, and they often have a pickguard to protect the body against scratches by picks and fingernails. Most acoustic guitars have six strings, but there are also 12-string versions. When an acoustic guitar is hooked up to an amplifier, it is referred to as acoustic/electric. Some acoustic/electric guitars incorporate a cutaway design, which makes it easier for electric guitar players to cross over to acoustic.
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